Project Description

Lewis Cass Technical High School is a university preparatory high school, located at 2501 Second Ave, at the corner of the Chrysler Service Drive, in the infamous downtown Detroit neighborhood, known as the Cass Corridor.  The school is named in honor of Lewis Cass, who was the Governor of Michigan from 1813 until 1831. Cass Tech High School was a part of the Detroit Public School system.  The original Cass Tech High School (pictured) was built in 1917 and was designed by noted-Detroit architects Malcomson & Higgonbotham, and later additions by Albert Kahn.  At seven stories tall and nearly 900,000 square feet, Cass Tech was the biggest Detroit Public School.  Cass Tech had one massive auditorium, several smaller auditoriums, 3 gymnasiums, and two swimming pools.  Many famous Detroiters graduated from Cass Tech, including John DeLorean, Lilly Tomlin, David Allen Grier, Diana Ross, Jack White, and Kwame Kilpatrick.  Cass Tech alumni and former students are known as the “Cass Technical Technicians.”  Cass Tech High School was a property of the Detroit Public School system.

Cass Tech High School closed in 2005 and became a world-wide juxtaposition because Cass Tech was known for educating Detroit’s most famous, and then it was all of the sudden abandoned and everything was left behind to rot.  Photos began to surface all across the world from inside the ruins of Cass Tech and it ignited rage and outcry from the Cass Tech Alumni Association, but Detroit Public Schools had their hands full.  Detroit Public Schools was already millions of dollars in deficit and Cass Tech was just too big to keep secure from the constant scrappers and urban explorers that continued to enter.  A new Cass Tech High School was built directly next door and the student were transferred to the new school for the 2006-2007 school year.

The old Cass Tech High School was demolished in 2011.

As of 2015, a large empty field sits where the old Cass Tech once stood so proud and tall.

 

Last days of Cass Tech High School.  It was demolished in 2011.